Collaboration in more than 46 countries.

You are leaving the country website to access another site in the group. Regulatory constraints and medical practices vary from country to country. Consequently, the information provided on the site in which you enter may not be suitable for use in your country.

NORTH AMERICA

Canada

United States

LATIN AMERICA

Argentina

Brazil

Mexico

Perú

GLOBAL

CEVA Global

EMEA (REGIONAL)

Denmark

Egypt

France

Germany

Hungary

Italy

Netherlands

Poland

Portugal

Romania

South Africa

Spain

Sweden

Tunisia

Turkey

Ukraine

United Kingdom

ASIA PACIFIC

Asia Pacific (Regional)

CHINA

India

Indonesia

Japan

Korea

Malaysia

Philippines

Publications

An abrupt method to dry off cows has disadvantages and is considered inappropriate for current dairy cows due to welfare issues and risks for intramammary infections (IMI). A gradual cessation of lactation (by feeding or milking frequency reduction) has been the generally recommended method for drying off cows to prevent these adverse effects. However, a new alternative to the gradual approach is to abruptly stop milking at the same time as using cabergoline (CAB), a prolactin inhibitor. The aim of the study was to compare the net costs of 3 different methods of drying off cows [gradual reduction in feed (referred to as gradual feeding), gradual reduction in milking frequency (referred to as gradual milking), and abrupt cessation of milking with CAB]. A stochastic Monte Carlo simulation model, at cow level, was developed to calculate the net costs of applying these methods. All inputs for the model were based on literature information, authors’ expertise, and expert knowledge. The net costs were determined by only including costs and benefits, which varied between the 3 methods. The model simulated a cow from 7 d before the day of drying off until the end of the next lactation. The likelihood of whether a cow was leaking milk early in the dry period was determined. Subsequently, it was determined whether or not the cow will get an IMI during the dry period, where the probability of getting an IMI was higher for cows leaking milk than for cows not leaking milk. If the IMI was not cured during the dry period, the cow had an IMI at calving. Also, milk production and feed requirements were modeled, and labor for applying the drying off method was included. For all methods, the net costs were calculated as the sum of costs for feed during the gradual feed reduction period, costs for applying the gradual-milking method, and the IMI costs during the dry period and lactation, minus the milk revenues during the transition from lactation to the dry period. Under default conditions, the average net cost of abrupt cessation of milking with CAB was €49.6/cow. The data showed that 90% of the net costs ranged from −€13.7 to €307.8/cow. The average net costs for gradual feeding and gradual milking were €99.1 and €71.5/cow, respectively. In conclusion, abrupt cessation of milking with CAB saved €49.5 and €21.9/cow on average compared with gradual feeding and gradual milking, respectively. This difference was mainly due to more milk returns and lower labor and IMI costs during lactation.

Share this publication:

Full text link:

Article in open access
This site is registered on wpml.org as a development site.